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5 Songs to Add to Your Repertoire!


Happy May! Hopefully you checked out last month's blog post where we answered many of the FAQs we receive and explained what to expect in a first lesson! One of the first things we ask students to accomplish before their second lesson is choosing 5-10 songs they'd like to work on during the course of their lessons. Of course, for many students, selecting a variety of songs is a daunting task. Well not to worry! May's blog is here to guide you through adding new and exciting songs to your repertoire!


1) Pick a song that you love to sing.

Most students, even beginners, come to their first lesson with several songs in mind that fall under this umbrella. Pick at least one song that feels good in your soul when you sing it and to which you feel a deep connection. Sure, it seems like a basic idea, but what better way is there to ensure that you'll enjoy practicing your song even in between voice lessons?


2) Pick a song that challenges you.

Especially if you're a beginner, you should start out with songs that feel comfortable in your voice while you focus on building healthy technique. However, it is always great to also pick a song that feels a bit challenging to you to tackle in the future! After some time, you'll be happy to have a song in your back pocket that shows the improvement you've made in your lessons.


3) Pick a classic.

What constitutes a classic? In this sense, we are referring to certain songs that are repeatedly used for events, universally loved and incredibly worth having in your repertoire. For example, songs like the traditional "Amazing Grace," classical "Ave Maria" and even jazz standards like "At Last," are popular at weddings. Another song that is incredibly helpful to have under your belt? The National Anthem. As a singer, you'll be asked to perform this song A LOT.


4) Pick a song in a style outside of your comfort zone.

Most students enjoy a few styles of music, like pop and musical theatre, and tend to stick with songs from those styles. We like to encourage students to choose songs in all styles. Throw in a country song! An aria in Italian! An 80s rock ballad! Singing in styles outside of your comfort zone will help turn you into a well rounded musician. And who knows, maybe you'll find a genre you didn't even know was "your thing."


5) Pick an audition song that suits you.

This one is very important if you plan to be a professional vocalist! There is no better feeling than having a book full of potential audition songs so that you're prepared when an audition pops up! Ask your teacher for help with selecting songs that best present you and for 16 bar cuts (or whatever specifics the audition calls for) of the song.


There you have it! Hopefully this helps you brainstorm some useful (and slightly challenging) music to add to your repertoire. As always, feel free to ask your teacher for advice, too. That's why we're here!








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